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evacuations in the low-lying areas of queens and brooklyn. he ordered that in hurricane irene and thankfully, there were no problems at that time. but officials taking this very seriously, potentially flooding in brooklyn and queens on the atlantic ocean and new york bay, as hurricane sandy bears down on the northeast. we will have continuing live coverage, throughout the hour. >> the fox extreme weather alert for you, the national hurricane center issuing the latest advisory on hurricane sandy, set to strike in the north evert. a rare super storm. the hurricane lashing north carolina with pounding winds and rain. massive waves are crashing ark shore on the outer banks. people in connecticut are bracing for the worst with the governor declaring a state of emergency there. let's return to our chief meteorologist. you know, rick, we heard mayor michael bloomberg ordering mandatory evacuations for low-lying areas in brooklyn and queens. you are talking about hundreds and thousands of people and shutting down the subway and buses. >> this happened last year in hurricane irene and it wasn't that
, ladies and gentlemen, i stood in this very spot a year ago for hurricane irene. there were some similar dire warnings then, and when the storm came, it actually leapfrogged over new york city and landed further up the hudson river and caused considerable damage there, although we didn't know it as the storm was happening and one of the things i've learned in 40 years of coverage these events is that it is always worse than it initially seems because you begin to tally the damage once daylight comes and once things get more calm. but this will not be like a traditional hurricane, this will not be something that happens in six or eight hours and then we're on with our lives and this is an enduring event, it is the collision of the three big weather systems, the tropical hurricanes, the frigid winds coming down from the north and that western low pressure system, everything's going to get churned around and it's going to be part of our lives, unfortunately, for several days, and i think, i fear that before this is over, it's going to be a story with many, many tragic ramifications. but sta
, when hurricane irene came through and the flooding that i've seen down to my left here, going out underneath the boardwalk, out on the streets where all the homes are on long beach is already much, much worse than irene. further left, because of the conditions here and the camera angle, you can't see it. but there is a lifeguard station that last year 14 months ago in irene was swept off its foundation. it's done it again. the authorities have been appealing to people all day to get out. get out of long beach a get across the bridge. >> bret: stay safe. we will head further south and correspondent steve harrigan is in ocean city, maryland. good evening, steve. >> good evening, bret. hurricane force winds here cracking over the seawall. 15 to 20-foot waves. part of the pier has been destroyed by the waves. the governor making a forceful statement saying stay in your house. this storm is going to kill people. we want to limit the loss of life. stay in the house. as many as 30,000 people now without power. as the conditions are likely to continue to get worse throughout the night. br
after hurricane irene which left people without power in that state for days. martha. martha: we'll find out what lessons were learned from irene at the same time as this last year. so many places out of power for so many days. we'll see whether or not we're in better shape this time around. airports across the northeast have been brought to a virtual stand still. that is causing a ripple effect for travelers around the country. airports across the new york city area are open. but carriers canceled 7600 flights. basically you're not going anywhere in and out of this area today and down to d.c. as well in many cases. some airlines added flights out of the northeast. so they can move their planes off the ground and out of the storm's path to other areas around the country. all of this adds to the travel nightmare and indeed amtrak as well is suspending their train service across the region. so folks, where you are is where you're going to sty for the time-being. the storm is shutting down the new york stock exchange. the last time that happened was almost 30 years ago. during hurricane glo
in perspective. hurricane irene which you can see her on the right caused nearly $16 billion in damage and take a look at sandy in comparison. with sandy expected to linger over the northeast for days one can only imagine if the difference in size will reflect the difference in damage. we'll have the latest on the storm track and its strength in one minute. rick? >> reporter: the winds have picked up even more from last hour. steady now in the 40s and 50s with gusts but feel like over 0 miles per hour. i can't even read the wind gauge or turn into the rain because rain and sand is pelting us it many pretty painful. we are just after low tide. so the surf i'll it's rough is not encroaching on the boardwalk at this point and ocean avenue is still relatively dry. but other roads in the community are under water and many other roads across the state of new jersey are hazardous. the garden state parkway has been closed from exit 63 south to cape may. that's a major highway in new jersey shut down because of flooding in both directions. in fact atlantic city we are told is virtually under water in so
that plunged into downtown manhattan shattering the previous record that because set by eileen whic irene which folks thought was pretty bad 14 months ago. sandy was nearly 1600 miles when it caught up with the winter storm in diameter and created very dangerous seas over a stretch of the atlant atlantic nearly 1600 miles in diameter. it has been a devastating storm. we are waiting right now for an update from the new york city mayor michael bloomberg on all of this. you've seen our reporters have been out there this morning and have been showing us the damage that has been devastating. that the scene where mayor bloomberg will be moments away. look at these pictures, it literally rushed into the shoreline of new jersey last night. 80-mile an hour wind there, pushed a wall of water inland -frbgs looking a -- look at the flooding in these areas. this shows us the true scope but it's yet to be completely understood. we start this with a brand-new hour of "america's newsroom." i'm martha maccallum. >> i'm bill hemmer. good morning again we are live in the battleground state, columbus, ohio today.
lock does it stay out? what do you think? >>guest: well, we should look at irene. this will cause at least as much problem as irene. i expect this to get their act right back together and do not be viced if this is a category two or category three by sunday before it turned to the northwest. it is very warm water in the atlantic. very warm. we back in the 1950s. we had ten major hurricanes on the east coast including hazel in 1954 in mid-october which had a path similar to this but it was to the west. that want into north carolina and you notice this storm is attacking from the southeast, right? and basically, it is that path superimposed to the east so hazel led to wind gusts at 100. >>neil: what makes it a mess for the northeast, combining with the other areas? >>guest: what makes it, (a), it moves slow and intensifies miling water to the northeast beaches. that is first. >>neil: and it sits? >>guest: full moon and look at the way the coast is shaped. it is shaped so you funnel water into new york city and push the storm surge in. the normal hurricane like irene comes along the
received? >> we don't have the exact counts on that. there is water damage. >> hurricane irene, we know state wide $1.3 billion in damages your community affect bid that. any lessons learned from that in 2011? >> we here abide by our planning and execute our 120 hour plan of giving people plenty of notice in an impending danger is coming. and we always hope for the best. unfortunately, the worst has come. >> okay. finally wrapping up any word you have to residents you that want to leave with them with this sneng. >> only use 911 for life threatening emergencies. nor nonlife threatening emergencies use our nonlife threatening emergency hot line. >> thank you. we'll check back in with you. thank you. >> this storm is making its presence felt now. sandy taking aim at the nornl east this hour. warnings to head for higher ground coming for days now. coming up next, we're live where 30,000 people were told to get out and get out, fast. >> catastrophic event we have faced in any of our lifetimes. >> there will be people who die in this storm. >> this is not the time to be a show off or stupid.
jersey area. many of the area has memories of irene on their minds. irene caused billions of dollars of damage. already people here are getting ready for what some are calling the perfect storm. one saw homeowner sandbagging his home yesterday. this is the calm before the storm which is why experts say it is time to get yourself a disaster preparation kit. make sure you have bottled water, batteries and plenty of food on hand in case the storm does the damage it is expected to do. we are live in belmar, new jersey robert moses, fox news. >>> robert, thank you so much. >>> the fiscal cliff is still too much off but the tax hikes and spending cuts already hampering our economy. diane mess is heis here. >> the fiscal cliff may not have hit left but it is already hampering growth in the u.s. economy wiping out nearly 1 million jobs so far this year. the report goes on to forecast if congress fails to avert the cliff 6 million jobs will be lost before 2014 sending the unemployment rate up to 12 percent. part of the problem is the anticipation of the cliff. we are looking at 100 billion au
through that we might know? >> exactly. it was very similar to hurricane irene last summer where the winds expanded several hundred miles out from the center of the storm. in a typical hurricane, most of the strong winds are near the core of the hurricane. in this case, obviously the strong winds were hundreds and hundreds of miles out from the center. that is very similar to hurricane irene last year. >> greta: do you fly straight through it? i imagine it's a rough ride and when you get to the eye of the storm it's calm. is that not what happens? >> well, we fly at 10,000 feet, and the idea is to go right through the center of the hurricane so you can measure the core of the storm, and then also measure the winds on the periphery of the storm, so it normally gets very rough right near the center and then typically out away from the center when the winds lighten up, it's not so bad any more, and in this case, for hurricane irene, at least on friday, the strong winds were well out from the center, and we had some really nasty stuff to go through on the north side of the storm, probably 105,
mean, twhapd during irene? >> caller: well, i have to tell you, i was here personally, the same way. and probably, it was exactly the same scenario. i think most people are heeding the warning and are staying home and staying put. and that's allowing them to stay safe and not, you know, causing the unnecessary injury or illness from occurring. >> yeah. similarity. so, so far, so good, right? >> caller: so far, so good. we are keeping our fingers crossed. like i said, we have extra staff on board tonight. everybody's bunking out at the hospital. we are waiting to see, you know, if we are needed. >> doctor, this is heather, i did want to ask you a question. i know you don't want to talk specifically about the situation right now at the new york medical center where they are evacuating people. but what happens when have you patients who are on ventilators? they have at least four infants on ventilator there is. they are having to evacuate them and take them out of the hospital, carry patients down the stairwells. how do do you that? >> caller: well, very carefully, obviously. but what
to compare it to would be eirene. i was here in new york for irene last year. this is much much worse than irene. much larger storm. not necessarily a stronger storm but because it is so large it has this tremendous amount of energy with it. all of that energy can do quite a bit of damage. when the sun comes up today we are going to get a good idea as to the real full extent of what actually happened over the past 24-hours. >>> that is for sure. this has been so large up and down the east coast. it has been as far west as chicago with 20-foot waves in lake michigan. >> all day and all night you have been sending us the pictures of the storm. >> i live in long island on the north shore of long island. you have been hearing about that. look at all of the downed trees this is in my house alone. last half this is before everybody went to bed last night we had lost 5 trees. these are 100 foot tall or hire trees. a lot of people have been sending us in their photos and videos. this is also on the long island sound. things are a real mess out there. heather childers joins us with a look at some o
of the power outages. that is twice the number of houses impacted by hurricane irene last year. at least 18 deaths reported in seven states. for a little more perspective, how about this? one in six people are without power in new york, pennsylvania and new jersey. in new jersey we find ron, a spokesperson for new jersey power and light. what are you dealing with right now? >> we're dealing with outages to more than 930,000 customers. that is a significant portion of the 1.1 million customers we serve throughout the state. jenna: we saw that explosion at the substation. it was a big dramatic moment that affected power in the city of manhattan. did you have something similar out in new jersey? what caused the power outages? >> we did not have something similar to that we took some of the substations in barrier island communities and coastal communities off-line for safety reasons last night. our biggest concern is damage to our transmission lines of the we've started our assessment process and the winds will cooperate a little bit today we'll get helicopters up in the air to do an aerial ass
with these types of storms. we had your cain irene last year with over a million customers without power. rachel came through this summer knocked out the same amount without power. we've been through this before. our local officials have been through this before. they're well-trained. they have good plans how to respond to this. we've been communicating and people are taking steps to be prepared. so we feel fairly confident in virginia folks are taking the steps to be ready for whatever the storm might bring. jon: i know you have got the national guard out and ready did. you've got power crews coming in from other states to help restore power as well, don't you?. >> yeah. we know many of our power companies in virginia are prepositioning out-of-state resources coming in. national guard we deployed them in key areas around the commonwealth to be ready to deploy and help out local officials that might need assistance. we have our state police and out there. department of transportation. they have their crews across the commonwealth. they're already to go to help out as needed. jon: from virginia's
in losses last year from irene making it the fourth costly experienced? >> this is will be worse. three storms. we've never seen anything like this. it's definitely going to be devastating. >> gregg: i was reading forbes, i wish we could put it on o up the scream. beside for potential life and safety, economists are predicting that it will upwards of $55 billion in economic damage? >> yeah, it's hard to tell. we don't really know how it's going to go through. estimates are all over the place. there is one positive. sectors that desperately need more work, construction workers, electricians, plumbers all the rest, they will be finding more work. so there is some stimulus there, but again it's mainly to the negative. >> gregg: if you are contractor out there, this maybe the silver lining. the other thing, we have seen in past disasters that it dramatically affects unemployment and g.d.p. because those are tied together? >> absolutely. people won't be going to work. as you said, retailers won't be selling, there won't be tax revenues. and g.d.p. measures how much we produce. if we are not
the fox business network. there are estimates this could be 20 billion compare that to hurricane irene that was $15 billion. some are saying it could be as big as hurricane katrina. how could that be? >> we are talking the east coast. we are talking about places that aren't necessarily prepared for this stuff. new york city shut down for two-days the stock market shut down for two-days. i think we are going to end up adding in the lost costs -- the subways aren't up for another two-days. that number is large there's no doubt about it. the estimates seem to be picking up. yesterday there was credible sources saying 35-45 billion. >> you look at the infrastructure new york city, the tunnels, boston elsewhere the number really starts going up. >> flooding unique flooding, salt water. this is an uncommon storm unusual characteristics and it will be involved as well. >> the economy is certainly growing at not too great rate. an anemic rate. what does it mean for the overall economy. >> it is pretty frightening. you couple this with the notion of fiscal cliffs. the last couple weeks the stoc
to the debate with blame for the administration's failures. irene e-mailed us i am independent registered nonpartisan who will be voting in this election. i found joe biden's performance so offensive i could barely watch it. >>> this is an amazing story. we will tell you all about it. >> can you figure out the word of the day on your screen right now? something we talked about earlier in the show. stick around for the answer. [ giggling ] [ laughing ] [ laughing ] [ laughing ] [ laughing ] ♪ >> two minutes until the top of the hour. we'll look at the good, the bad and ugly. the family dog saved the life of a couple's newborn baby. the partners would not have checked on her if duke hadn't jumped on their bed and shaking it uncontrolably. the twins are fighting the heavy eye lids so they can eat their lunch. oh, you can sleep won and they ended up with more spaghetti on the faces. the ugly. a woman walked out of a store with a wedding dress she didn't pay for . she went in the shop with others posing as a bridal party. >> that is brian. not stealing dresses for you. >> looking at a delaye
say it can be worse than irene. >> don't pay attention to it being downgraded. it doesn't mean anything. it's not really completely a tropical storm. it's going to be transitioning to what we kind of consider a nor'easter. we are accustomed to nor'easters. that kind of a event. moisture associated with a tropical storm. tropical storm holds a lot more water in the atmosphere as it transitions. that water is still going to be there radar picture showing the rain is following across parts of the carolinas. the rain is going to be heavy all day. battering waves, a lot of wind. beach erosion and that sort of thing here. go forward on the track of this storm. continues to move northeast. takes this unprecedented left-hand hook. that's where we've begin to go through a transition to a different type of a storm. people are used to hurricanes strengthening when there is warm water. this isn't going to be strengthening for those purpose purposes. snran way a nor'easter strengthens. european model track shows this. right around parts of jiewj. i want to point out other things on this map
on the east coast. concerns it could hammer areas hit hard by hurricane irene. that was in august of 2011. crews are now getting ready for that. have a listen. >> just taking precautions. 75 yards off the river. full moon tide, hurricane, a lot of wind. it is going to come. just a matter how much. >> you get cinder blocks. we put stuff upstairs. like big stuff like tvs couches tables. stuff in the kitchen we move in case the water gets super high. >> try to be as prepared as you can. there are only some things you can do. we hope and pray the storm goes east. bill: those folks are in florida. janice dean in the fox news extreme weather center where she will stay until tuesday or wednesday of next week. >> or thursday. bill: what do you see right now, jd? >> as you mentioned we've got a lot of things coming together. we have kind of an atmospheric traffic jam that will allow this storm system to move northward and back up into the coast. this is the arctic cold front that will kind of break down as it moves eastward. that will allow this system to move westward. so right now, a hurricane 8
. irene was lots of water. we had extensive flooding. we don't expect anything near than that. this is serious storm. it will on us for a long time, three days or so with gale force or better winds. >> reporter: that was an emergency official we spoke with earlier. one issue i wanted to bring to your attention. water is coming up. beach is coming close to the sand dunes and ten miles there was a $37 million beach restoration program. a lost those homes are protected because of that new beach restoration which did hold up with hurricane irene. they have a lot of faith to keep their homes safe. people in those low-lying areas can expect extreme flooding. there were no mandatory evacuations in this area. so people who did leave left on their own accord. >> jamie: always good to take the safe route. elizabeth, i know you will be riding out the storm. keep us posted. thank you. >> gregg: brand-new report out shows the economy is growing, but, you know what, if you dig deeper, it's not good news at all. why some experts are saying there is a lot more behind those numbers. >> jamie:
outage problems. if you think there are 0 million people without power, with irene people didn't have power for well over a week. in this case it possibly turned into the same thing. a week from tomorrow is election day. it's possible a big part of the area won't have power by the time they get towards next tuts. >> people with power, it's freezing cold. 48 degrees. rick, thank you. >> some parts of jersey city under curfew. jersey city mayor joins us by phone. good evening, mayor. and what is the status of your city tonight, sir? >> good evening, we took a pretty good beating in jeersy city tonight. high tide concurred with the grounding and landing of the hurricane all at a full moon. meet yolists predict this urge up the hudson and rivers and they were right, it was unprecedented. the river surged from both rivers. we issued mandatory evacuations 7:00 a.m. monday, this morning. people didn't abide by that. it has to do with that title surge. concurring with the time that hurricane hit wland high winds. >> is there any deaths or serious injuries? >> a lot of damage and property dama
, says cancer research is suffering under the president's policies. irene frazier joins me next. humans -- even when we cross our t's and dot our i's, we still run into problems. namely, other humans. which is why, at liberty mutual insurance, auto policies come with new car replacement and accident forgiveness if you qualify. see what else mes standard at libertymutual.com. liberty mutual insurance. responsibility. what's your policy? (applause) >> my next guest has been living with breast cancer for 11 years and is undergoing chemotherapy for the 6th time and also the founder of the maureen fraser foundation for women's cancer research. please welcome her back. good to have you back. [applause] >> hopefully-- and by full disclosure, maureen is the wife of the show's producer. and i can't imagine, six times through chemotherapy. what's next? >> well, first of all, have you noticed my new hair? >> i have, it looks terrific. [applause]. >> it does. i'm so happy not to be wearing a scarf. i can never get the wig to stop itching. as short as it is, i'm happy. i've been fortunate and unfo
and everything. >> you generally stick around. how about irene, you stuck around for that one, too? >> caller: yes, di. >> how did you stick around? >> caller: i did good. i stayed right in my room. >> one of the rearngs evelyn, that officials tell people to get out is, they don't want to risk the lives of rescuers. >> caller: i know. >> trying to get to people like you. does that ever cross your mind? >> caller: well, today, i told my family, this is my last time for now on when they say evacuate, i am. because today, i cried. i was scared. this is worse than what i went through last year. i will never go through this again. >> you are not out of the woods yet. >> caller: i know, i know. yeah. i know. >> do you have any plans to... to try it get out even under the current circumstances? or are you going to hunker down? >> caller: right now, like i said, thank god, the water went down. but if it's down, i will leave in the morning, you know what i'm saying? right now, thank god, it's all right. the trees we had -- they're small. i'm between two houses and the trees, all, my point's far are aw
with irene and all the damage with that. not too dissimilar storm. potential impacts and winds this time, much bigger story, i think we'll see winds 60-80 miles an hour and this time a long storm, 24-36 hours. that means we'll see a plotted more people with significant power outages and lots of damage to the beaches. >> shep: and cold. rick riechmuth will keep on it day in and day out. 12 days until americans pick the next president. new poll governor romney gaining ground in a crucial battleground state. president obama's lead among women voters in virginia is down 12 points and it's six points. it shows the president and governor are tied at 47% among women voters nationwide. month ago he a 16-point lead. women are projected to make up more than 16% of the electorate. they have cut the men 13 points to five points. a spokesperson says she is not buying it. any poll that shows us tied with women and men is not a poll we are placing bets on in vegas. president targeting three it's a as he wraps up a 48-hour campaign marathon and governor romney is doing the make or break battleground of
' topping what we saw at the height of irene so the areas are seeing water rising storm surge and we could see 20' to 30' waves on top of that so this area right along here could be rewritten. it could be devastating for all of the beach areas. your daytime as we head through the evenings rain will increase, it is going to be a wind event and it will be a storm surge event. we will see incredible beach erosion. overnight, gusts at over 100 miles per hour for all of 9 areas shaded in orange as the center moves onshore in the next several hours to the north of cape may. the north si bring the worst of the storm surge and the worst of the rain and the worst of the wind. on tuesday, still, heavy rain and tropical storm force gusts and maybe hurricane gusts. then the snowy part of storm in feet across the appalachian mountains. that is for the record books already. >>neil: amazing. now, down to outside the new york stock exchange the sand bags are literally outside the big board headquarters and they have shut trading down today. they will shut trading down tomorrow, as william. but, today, by
than a sudden surge which is what you would expect from a hurricane, and which we saw with irene 14 months ago. it will be less dangerous, but make no mistake about it. there will be a lot of water, and low-lying areas will experience flooding. the city's department of transportation and environmental protection will be deployed throughout the city to address flooding conditions. as i said yesterday there are six hospitals and 41 -- >> all right, that is mayor michael bloomburg talking about what the city is doing to prepare for sandy which is expected to really reach new york city and this area tomorrow evening and into monday morning. he did mention that south of new york is expected to get a direct hit including philadelphia where the mayor has declared a state of emergency that begins at 5:00 tomorrow morning. so less than 12 hours from now and last until 5:00 p.m. on tuesday. as you can see, the path of the storm is going to go right into the most populated part of the united states of america. new york city, philadelphia and up to new england. we will keep an eye on that and k
. irene brought in $4.3 billion in damage last year. it was one of the top ten costliest u.s. returns in history. the insurance adjusters are already on the scene they could go in as early as wednesday and write checks on the spot for policyholders>> wall street some of the banks are heclosed today. >> they are closed today and likely tomorrow. electronic trading late last night much of lower manhattan has already been evacuated. they are operating on a work at home basis. heather? >> here is something of major concern we have seen gas prices dip recently but they could be on their way up. that's because refineries could be shut down. >> 6 northeast oil refineries could be affected they have 6.2 million of barrels a day. october 1st the official month in the 2013 model year. if some of the car dearlies shut down they may not be unloading the vehicles. >> keep our fishings crossed on gas prices and insurance issues as well. >> lauren thank you so much. >> good to see you. quick look at headlines. he was the prime suspect. ainsley take it away from here. >> he was the prime suspect in t
of storm like this before? >> in terms of intensity? i immediately think of last year's hurricane irene that treated delaware more lightly than it treated our surrounding states. >> any advice for residents there this evening? and what can they expect when the sun comes up later this morning? >> the best advice we are giving now is for people to -- who say well things look good out there, and jm going to go out to the store or go out and do my normal life. take a day. we have flooded roads. we have trees that are down and branches that are down on roadways. we have power lines that are down. so conditions -- there are some dangerous conditions out there across the state. if people go out too early, we could have some issues. we don't want to have that because we have come through pretty good so far. people just need to take a day, stay home, let the highway crews go out and clear the roads. let the electrical crews go out and put the lines back up and deal with those situations and not have to go out and try to rescue people who get themselves in trouble because they just went out too s
. when you thing we had hurricane irene last year and it was around $4 billion storm, this certainly has all the potential ability to be about that strong, if not worse than we were doling the right now this is the storm at 105 miles per hour sustained wind, not that pretty on the satellite image, but we will continue to watch it pull to the north. we are already feeling the impact across florida and we have tropical storm warnings in affect. we will talk tomorrow into saturday morning with winds around 40 to 50 miles per hour. these are like pictures from miami and you can see certainly the rough surf which will continue. we will see 3" to 5" of rain and wind all day tomorrow at 30 to 50 miles per hour but wednesday you get beyond florida we will start to see things becoming much more concerning, the track of the storm right now continuing to bring up to new jersey or new york and possibly cape cod, but in the center of that is what we are talking about. the first part of the storm between now and saturday morning, we are talking about tropical storm force conditions look the coast, ver
and it is getting colder. it is not like we didn't know the storm was coming. we had learning moments with irene and another winter storm that hit us with a punch and a lot of the simple things they do not communicate properly and we do not have the out of state crews work properly with our local utilities and con-ed still is not delivering dry ice. i have been personally out there delivering the try ice that has been provided and when you get off the back of the truck the ice was gone. people need it. >>neil: but it is more than that. i know in tokyo or places that are ravaged by earthquakes and tsunamis with each one they build a stronger building, but here, they build the same transformer that is no more upgraded to withstand serious weather than the prior one and we are right back in the same pot. >>guest: i share the senate homeland security committee and i will reach out and continue to reach out to the governor and my colleague, outside of new york -- outside of jerusalem, new york city is the number one target for terrorists. the utilities view manpowers and hours as an expense and new y
. at the peak of irene. we're dealing with a history making storm. let's take a look at the center. we expect the center to make its way on shore in the next hour or so. so landfall perhaps within the hour. bring you the latest. there is the latest track again. moving west/northwest at 28 miles per hour. again, we think south jersey, around cape may, but we are getting reports that atlantic city is under water. wind gusts again, as we head throughout the evening. wind gusts in excess of 100 miles per hour. hurricane force winds extending 120 miles away from the center of the storm. we're going to feel this up and down the coastline, the worst of storm surge, wind and rain north of where the center makes landfall. kimberly? >> kimberly: thank you. we'll check back with you later in the program. it may hit landfall in this program. let's go to rick leventhal, live in point pleasant, new jersey, where we have seen the conditions deteriorating by the hour. rick? >> we moved off the beach. it was too nasty out there. we moved to the hotel one block from the beach. where the power is now coming on
it was for irene. it will be a long time to restore power. at this point, i don't think it is a good estmaste. >> brian: your original estimate 7-10 days? >> that's right. that was too optmistic. >> steve: and any advice for people with a generator and watching this and wires down in the neighborhood? >> we'll be out patrolling and the public officials urge don't go outside and don't go near electric wires or downed wires. you don't know if it is a phone or cable wire you don't know if it is wrapped up in our wires down the line. >> brian: when something like this happens, is it worth calling to report or should we assume that everyone is down and we will get to you when we can. >> customers should report an out age and if it goes off report it afterwards. >> gretchen: a lot of people can do that on line as well. if they have computer service. >> brian: i another question for you . in terms of water receding, the worst is over and water is getting out of there, is that what you are seeing? >> brian: that's what we are see we are looking at substations that took on water and assess the damage
and down the shore. >> it is just like nothing i have ever seen before. you know, we had irene. last year we had a nor'easter in '92. i remember as a kid hurricane donna but nothing like this. there are so many people stranded without shelter. and the damage to the public infrastructure, to the boardwalks, municipal buildings, firehouses it is just endless. bill: frank pallone, thank you. we're going to stay in touch with you and a lot of others down there and hopefully get the word out. if we can help in any way making the word more public we certainly will, sir. thank you and good luck to you and your family. >> thank you. bill: frank pallone, democrat on the jersey shore. waking up to a whole new world as so many people are. >> sandy's wrath is extending into west virgina. have you seen the snow that got dumped on west virgina. look at this scene. blizzard conditions there. up to three feet of snow in some parts of the state. we're live there on the ground now. we're going to tell you what is going on. bill: while we continue to deal with that storm damage we can not forget this. you'r
did have a washover in the same spot as when hurricane irene hit. >> shepard: how bad is that? >> it can fill up a couple of feet. >> shepard: be careful out there, i know it's going to be a long night because these winds and the rains are scheduled to continue throughout the night. we have the weather loop again. i want to he show you one characteristic that the weather folks didn't anticipate. here is kind of the center of it right as it goes ashore. all the rain is on this side. the back side is almost completely dry. not like a tropical system at all. more like a nor'easter with all of the wetness on this side. can you see it stretches way past cleveland. but up here, not as much rain. tonight, it's wind and sturgeon in new york city as we approach high tide. we're back with with the continuing coverage in three minutes as fox reports live tonight. 'm like...yeah, ok... little did i know that one week later i wasn't smoking. [ male announcer ] along with support, chantix is proven to help people quit smoking. it reduces the urge to smoke. some people had changes in behavio
. this will absolutely be a worse storm than what we saw with hurricane irene. interior sections for northern vermont and those things probably not as bad. coastal areas absolutely. here is a look at this storm right now doesn't look all that impressive. it looks big. you talk about this being a nor'easter. it's pulling all of this tropical moisture. storms hold a lot more moisture. you can have that much moisture ringing out into a nor'easter. that's why the rain is going to be so significant and going to be a very windy storm. rain already into florida. and we have had that there for 36 hours now. tonight moves in across parts of the carolinas. gets worse. the track does typically does. the start it moves off towards the northeast. then it cuts back toward the west. this is where it gets very interesting. don't pay that much attention to this. this category one hurricane. it's not going to be a typical hurricane and it's going to be strengthening as it makes landfall. we're going to be talking about major problems here. look at one of these models. anywhere you see the green and the blue, that's he
. 18,100 latest number of flights cancelled. it makes irene look like nothing. there it was some 10,000 flights cancelled then. it cost delta for example 15 million in profits back then. that gives you an idea what the airlines are going to be looking at with this storm. >> bill: we don't -- >> shepard: we don't know when laguardia is going to reopen. estimates how much this could hurt the economy. one thing is perfectly clear the impact will be substantial. >> yeah. here is what i think we are looking at 1-2 punch. first of all we have people staying home at work not getting paychecks. we have businesses that aren't operating here in new york city which is typically a 4 billion-dollar a day economy. could shave a tenth off of national g.d.p. but then we have all these federal dollars come in longer term we will see some kind of benefit from that it's going to take a while for it to play out. $20 billion the colmes of this storm. >> shepard: construction workers and on and on. there may be a dip in unemployment as a result of this. markets were closed for the second time. try tomorr
worse than when i stood here 14 months ago for hurricane irene. i would say that broadway which runs the entire length of new york city parallel with the ocean is under something like 5 feet. every single home is impossible to imagine how all of them aren't completely inundated on the ground level. the water goes back street after street after street as far as we can see. we cannot get out of this hotel right now to explore further. but it is a desperate situation for anybody who did not heed those warnings, which were said again and again by officials. get off of what is a barrier island. get out while you can. now it is way way too late. we wait for day break to see when this surge ends. and also the extent of the damage it has done. it is going to be bad here in long beach city and across the length of long island, shep. you and i have covered a the love hurricanes and we have seen a lot of storms. can i tell you i have never seen a storm surge like this, shep. >> shepard: jonathan hunt live on long island in new york. so, it's becoming clear what we are witnessing from virginia b
year, when irene came through here, and at some point, on the island, the bay actually touched the atlantic ocean. now, also reminiscent is what's going on in new york city, and that's that the mass transit has been shut down and we're talking the subways. the buses and the trains there. 5 million people go through their daily, so, really crippling that area, and you saw new york city mayor michael bloom berg and he's saying that the 1.1 million kids and city schools will not be going to class tomorrow. however, the new york stock exchange will be open, harris. >> harris: they're going to run on generators we understand and have electronic voting down on the new york stock exchange and anna kooiman, thank you very much. we're getting your images of the behemoth storm, and this is your point of view. patty shea snapped photos at rudy's inlet at virginia beach. wow. paul blare sending this photo of his brother ben pelted by rain and high winds in virginia bridge. and david d'amico from long port, new jersey, as it's coming up from that area, south of new york. and massive waves c
irene, goes by, the wind goes to the west even though it's strong to the west. it blows everything out. in this particular case, the wind keeps coming in from the southeast. >> yeah. all right. so the next thing i want to ask in terms of what -- for the people that didn't leave and heed the warning of governor cuomo in new york, governor kristchris kristi in new jersey, there a chance their homes could be below water. >> yeah. they could be below water for quite a while. what will happen is the tide tries to go out, and the wind will keep trying to stop the tietide from going out. it's a y dangerous situation. one of the things i got real upset with and i talked to you yesterday for quite a while about the whole situation is not putting the hurricane warning in effect because people think oh, it's a big nor'easter coming. big deal. we've gone through big nor'easters before. when the hurricane warning is put in effect because you have a hurricane coming, it's a very different story. my suggestion is once you've named that storm, you leave the name and the class fakings is important. >>
that to the list of things to do. >> i am being serious. this is very much like irene a couple of years ago but worse than that . we'll be dealing with a hybrid storm and super storm that emerges with a cold tront and hurricane inside of a nor'easter. if that sounds scary, you need to be prepared for the storm. it could be potentially devastating. millions of people will be affected by still a hurricane. we will see tropical storm force win and rain all across the coast of florida and extending 300 miles from the storm.this storm will get bigger. it hugs the coast over the weekend and tuesday, dc, philly and new york. you could see a storm packing winds of 60 or 80 miles per hour for hours and hours . storm surge as well with high tide. this being be an event that we have not seen in our lifetime. gretchen, you need to understand your evacuation route this weekend. >> gretchen: i will be calling up jd, help me find my evacuation route. >> i will help you. >> brian: we'll show up at your door. >> you, too, brian. you live close to the coast. >> brian: one anchor ahead. >> steve: can't yell a
rode out irene here also. i figured even if this storm was many orders of magnitude bigger, which it was, i'd only get a little flooding, and thankfully, at high tide on monday night -- 8:22 p.m., i'll always remember that exact time -- that turned out to be the case. megyn: for you they did, for others not so much. it's a very narrow island where the ocean is on one side and the bay is on the other, and i believe it's only one time in history that the two met due to storm surge or other reasons, and it happened this time with the main road that runs through long beach island looking like an ocean, and you can see some of the devastation in these pictures that resulted. describe the scene as you know it now outside. >> um, well, i can't see very much of the island. as you head down the main boulevard south from my town, you eventually -- in the southbound lane you come to a police car with its lights flashing, and they'll tell you the only people south of that point are, um, you know, crucial personnel or anyone who agrees to be escorted off the island by the police. so that's as
morning. people need to have is a place to go. this will not be like irene. this will be a much more are significant storm and likely the most significant storm there that anybody there in that area has ever lived through. back to you now. >> rick,ing thank you very much. >> shannon: the scandal surrounding the terror attack in benghazi just keeps growing. we had utah congressman jason chaffetz on the show. here is what he had to say about his conversation with commander of the u.s. africa command about requests for cia operatives for help during the benghazi assault. >> ky tell you on a first hand account in my meeting i dissed specifically did we have resources in the area the answer is, yes. did we have proximity and the answer is, yes. asked why we didn't send in the assets the general said he was not requested to do so meaning that somebody higher up than him. he is a four star general which there aren't a whole lot of people between him and the president did not request him to take action and that is what is so concerning. did requests per collate up from the ground for the peo
states at one time. we get plenty of practice with stuff like this, whether it's irene a week ago, isaac, months ago and we're mobilizing blood, making sure the blood supply needs to be in the key areas of the country. >> rick: the last minute preparations, there isn't a lot of time left. any last minute thing you can suggest to people that they do? >> the most important thing right now in the last minute if there's little time to get out and make sure you've got the food and water you need in terms of your kit, is to have a battery operated radio, something that can give you the ability to listen to any evacuation orders or any emergency notices that may be going out. >> rick: all right, charles one last thing-- >> mention that the red cross has-- >> that's exactly where i was going to lead you i saw the phone in your hand and talk about an app? >> i am going to talk about a hurricane app. the red cross has a hurricane app that's available for apple and android, folks can download it, it's got a tremendous "i'm safe" feature that allows people with a one push of a button let friends and
hurricanes will hit the northeast part of the united states. arguably, irene and sandy were not major hurricanes on the salve fir simpson scale. but if you look back at the 1950s a similar type of weather patterns produced tin major hurricanes up the eastern seaboard in a seven-year period including one, donna, gave hurricane-force winds everywhere from florida to maine. there is nothing new under the sun. you're seeing recycling what happened before except a lot of people don't know what happened before. a lot of that people say where is this coming from? basically go back and take a look at the maps. you will see where it came from. jenna: we forget quickly. tough to forget images we're seeing out of this storm. joe, nice to have you with us today. we appreciate the context very much. >> my pleasure. thank you for having me. jon: prayers for the victims it appeared survivors of superstorm sandy. pope benedict offering his condolences from the vatican expressing solidarity with all of the recovery crews. plus a new call for president obama to answer key questions about the deadly ter
-- just came through philadelphia last year. >> brian: was it irene? >> we're ready for it. >> brian: what i like about this in termination of it's going to be a severe storm, but you've given us lead time of the we've had four days, maybe more to prepare. it's up to personal responsibility. you can only do so much the do you agree? >> that's exactly right. it is up to the people to keep themselves out of harm's way. we ask them to stay off the streets once the winds start, to clean up their backyard so there are no projectiles flying that could harm them and just be prepared for maybe an extended period of time without electricity because as we know, this type of high winds, are going to knockout line, trees will go down, they need to be ready for an extended period of time without electricity. >> steve: i can't talk to you the last time a governor of a state regarding a hurricane, that wasn't along the coast. for the most part, pennsylvania is not a coastal state and yet here you've got this gigantic, historic storm that's wreaking havoc right there in your state of pennsylvania. >> bria
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